.
I

t’s now established news: the climate crisis has worsened, transcending boundaries of nations and touching on everything that society partakes in. National and international security remains vulnerable to the crippling effects of climate change. Countries such as the United States must treat the climate crisis with the urgency it requires—an urgency present with other national security threats. This was the main takeaway at the most recent TruCon, the annual conference of national security professionals from an interdisciplinary panel. The event is hosted by the Truman Center initiatives and Diplomatic Courier was a media partner.

The U.S. can transform the narrative and action by promoting green technology as foreign policy. No nation can ensure national security without addressing climate change. The question is, then: how can green tech as foreign policy be accelerated?

From left to right: Alexandra Meise, Visiting Senior Fellow for Climate and Energy, Truman National Center for National Policy, Shannon Kellog, Vice President of Public Policy, Amazon, Chidi Blyden, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for African Affairs, Office of the Secretary of Defense, and Anna Shpitsberg, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Energy Transformation. Photo courtesy of Truman Center.

A matter of great urgency

National security is not possible without addressing climate change. Climate change undermines security by spawning droughts, famines, migration, and natural disasters. The world has already witnessed these complications and how they intensify each year. For example, severe drought in Madagascar will likely spur the world’s first climate change induced famine according to the UN. No nation truly addresses their national security until they address the climate calamities already occurring.

Countries like the U.S. must treat climate change like other national security threats. National security threats receive varying levels of attention depending on the perception of their severity. However, governments often do not treat climate change the same way as other national security threats like war or terrorism despite it potentially stimulating each to occur in the future. Adding urgency to climate change and the green tech transformation remain essential to prevent rather than just respond to the burgeoning crisis.

Transformation is the goal. Using green tech as a method of foreign policy will help the world manage and prevent the climate crisis. While the transition poses certain challenges, preparedness and urgency will ensure greater security on the other side. Several opportunities exist in sustainable technology; understanding the opportunities that will come can accelerate the green tech transformation and better ensure national and international security in the process.

Global collaboration and leadership

The U.S. and other countries must first look at themselves. Despite the U.S. being better prepared to deal with the repercussions than others, they cannot fail to look at themselves and how the country falls short on climate action. Green tech promotion begins at home, and the U.S. can set an example for the world.

The U.S. is needed for change. The global influence of the U.S. means that the country must play a leading role in climate action and green tech adoption. The U.S.’s financial input remains powerful as well. U.S. investment is magnified as it draws in other investments.

Supporting countries is essential. The climate crisis touches on all parts of the world, but some remain better equipped to deal with the damage than others. Countries better prepared, such as the U.S. must support those more susceptible.

Africa’s vulnerability to climate change surpasses others despite their negligible impact on it. Economic prosperity and development often indicate a country’s resilience to managing the effects of climate change. The U.S. continues to support economic expansion in Africa so the continent can better deal with problems stemming from climate change. Africa remains the most susceptible and also the least prepared for the crisis. Countries need to support one another in adopting green tech and sustainable policies so they don’t leave anyone behind.

Green tech implementation needs support

Green tech requires all sectors working together. To enhance the urgency green tech receives, public and private sectors must work together. The cost of green tech transformation may look overwhelming. However, with public and private sectors working together, investment can align for the needed measures. Eventually, further in the transformation, green tech can fund itself through its opportunities, meaning it will become self-functioning beyond government grants.

The global supply chain needs to be resilient. A green tech transformation will require greater mineral extraction for batteries, energy, and other substances. This challenges the global supply chain that is heavily reliant on fossil fuels and carbon emissions. Preparing for potential disruptions in the global supply chain will make the transition easier.

There is a need for regulations and standards in green tech. A challenge for green tech adoption comes from unclear regulations and standards behind its implementation. It must be clear what needs to be invested in and how public and private entities can support the process. Government guidance can create a regulatory environment to guide green tech promotion and implementation.

Climate change surpasses the rate of sustainable transformation currently taking place. The climate crisis’ ripple effects transcend borders, making it a true global issue that affects everyone on the planet. Prioritizing green tech will transform systems to be more sustainable.

Editor’s Note: Each year, the Truman National Project and the Truman Center for National Policy, host a four-day event known as TruCon where leaders in national security meet to speak about pressing issues. This article is a summary of the key takeaways from the panel Climate and National Security: Green Tech as Foreign Policy. Diplomatic Courier was a media partner for TruCon 2021.

About
Whitney DeVries
:
Whitney DeVries is a Diplomatic Courier correspondent currently pursuing a master’s degree in International Affairs and Global Enterprise at the University of Utah.
The views presented in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent the views of any other organization.

a global affairs media network

www.diplomaticourier.com

Green Tech as Foreign Policy

Photo by Federico Beccari via Unsplash.

November 2, 2021

Countries such as the United States must treat the climate crisis with the urgency it requires—an urgency present with other national security threats, said national security experts at this year's TruCon.

I

t’s now established news: the climate crisis has worsened, transcending boundaries of nations and touching on everything that society partakes in. National and international security remains vulnerable to the crippling effects of climate change. Countries such as the United States must treat the climate crisis with the urgency it requires—an urgency present with other national security threats. This was the main takeaway at the most recent TruCon, the annual conference of national security professionals from an interdisciplinary panel. The event is hosted by the Truman Center initiatives and Diplomatic Courier was a media partner.

The U.S. can transform the narrative and action by promoting green technology as foreign policy. No nation can ensure national security without addressing climate change. The question is, then: how can green tech as foreign policy be accelerated?

From left to right: Alexandra Meise, Visiting Senior Fellow for Climate and Energy, Truman National Center for National Policy, Shannon Kellog, Vice President of Public Policy, Amazon, Chidi Blyden, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for African Affairs, Office of the Secretary of Defense, and Anna Shpitsberg, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Energy Transformation. Photo courtesy of Truman Center.

A matter of great urgency

National security is not possible without addressing climate change. Climate change undermines security by spawning droughts, famines, migration, and natural disasters. The world has already witnessed these complications and how they intensify each year. For example, severe drought in Madagascar will likely spur the world’s first climate change induced famine according to the UN. No nation truly addresses their national security until they address the climate calamities already occurring.

Countries like the U.S. must treat climate change like other national security threats. National security threats receive varying levels of attention depending on the perception of their severity. However, governments often do not treat climate change the same way as other national security threats like war or terrorism despite it potentially stimulating each to occur in the future. Adding urgency to climate change and the green tech transformation remain essential to prevent rather than just respond to the burgeoning crisis.

Transformation is the goal. Using green tech as a method of foreign policy will help the world manage and prevent the climate crisis. While the transition poses certain challenges, preparedness and urgency will ensure greater security on the other side. Several opportunities exist in sustainable technology; understanding the opportunities that will come can accelerate the green tech transformation and better ensure national and international security in the process.

Global collaboration and leadership

The U.S. and other countries must first look at themselves. Despite the U.S. being better prepared to deal with the repercussions than others, they cannot fail to look at themselves and how the country falls short on climate action. Green tech promotion begins at home, and the U.S. can set an example for the world.

The U.S. is needed for change. The global influence of the U.S. means that the country must play a leading role in climate action and green tech adoption. The U.S.’s financial input remains powerful as well. U.S. investment is magnified as it draws in other investments.

Supporting countries is essential. The climate crisis touches on all parts of the world, but some remain better equipped to deal with the damage than others. Countries better prepared, such as the U.S. must support those more susceptible.

Africa’s vulnerability to climate change surpasses others despite their negligible impact on it. Economic prosperity and development often indicate a country’s resilience to managing the effects of climate change. The U.S. continues to support economic expansion in Africa so the continent can better deal with problems stemming from climate change. Africa remains the most susceptible and also the least prepared for the crisis. Countries need to support one another in adopting green tech and sustainable policies so they don’t leave anyone behind.

Green tech implementation needs support

Green tech requires all sectors working together. To enhance the urgency green tech receives, public and private sectors must work together. The cost of green tech transformation may look overwhelming. However, with public and private sectors working together, investment can align for the needed measures. Eventually, further in the transformation, green tech can fund itself through its opportunities, meaning it will become self-functioning beyond government grants.

The global supply chain needs to be resilient. A green tech transformation will require greater mineral extraction for batteries, energy, and other substances. This challenges the global supply chain that is heavily reliant on fossil fuels and carbon emissions. Preparing for potential disruptions in the global supply chain will make the transition easier.

There is a need for regulations and standards in green tech. A challenge for green tech adoption comes from unclear regulations and standards behind its implementation. It must be clear what needs to be invested in and how public and private entities can support the process. Government guidance can create a regulatory environment to guide green tech promotion and implementation.

Climate change surpasses the rate of sustainable transformation currently taking place. The climate crisis’ ripple effects transcend borders, making it a true global issue that affects everyone on the planet. Prioritizing green tech will transform systems to be more sustainable.

Editor’s Note: Each year, the Truman National Project and the Truman Center for National Policy, host a four-day event known as TruCon where leaders in national security meet to speak about pressing issues. This article is a summary of the key takeaways from the panel Climate and National Security: Green Tech as Foreign Policy. Diplomatic Courier was a media partner for TruCon 2021.

About
Whitney DeVries
:
Whitney DeVries is a Diplomatic Courier correspondent currently pursuing a master’s degree in International Affairs and Global Enterprise at the University of Utah.
The views presented in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent the views of any other organization.