.
Presenter: Michael Bodekaer, Founder of Labster With the rise of virtual reality, virtual simulations are becoming increasingly prominent in nearly all sectors. In science education specifically, virtual laboratories are being used to educate high school and college students in a variety of different procedures, including laboratory safety guidelines, microscopic cell and cancer research, and real world simulations. In conjunction with hardware designed to help users interact with their virtual environments – such as virtual reality goggles and glove sensors - virtual simulations are quickly approaching a reality nearly as detailed as our own. And with virtual technology’s ease of distribution and cost-effective methods, VR-centered education may provide potential solutions to many of the problems faced by today’s educational institutions. Virtual simulation technology provides many solutions for problems in education. With the help of virtual reality technology, issues related to gaining relevant work experience in a school setting and keeping students active and engaged can be addressed with VR tech. Virtual simulation is already the preferred teaching method in many disciplines. In flight schools around the world, flight simulators are being used in conjunction with traditional teaching methods in an effort to educate students as they gain relevant flight experience without the dangers of actually flying. In fact, over 90% of experimental comparisons favored flight simulation and training instead of just training alone. Virtual simulations can be used in almost any field. In addition to its applicability in flight schools, virtual simulations can also be used in almost any sector, including architecture, politics, and science education. Only 41% of STEM students finish their degree. With less than half of STEM students finishing their degree, there is a need for new technology to be developed in order to keep students interested and engaged. Through virtual simulation technology, however, students not only stay constantly engaged with their education, but also develop a skillset that will be relevant to the workforce upon graduation. Virtual reality is easily distributable and cost-effective. Unlike traditional laboratory settings that cost time, money, and space, virtual laboratories are available to anyone with a smart device such as a smartphone, tablet, or even a simple Internet browser. Therefore, virtual simulation technology has the ability to alleviate issues with costs, time, and space that so many educational institutions experience. “These simulations empower students in their belief to go out there with their skills and solve really important global challenges.” – Michael Bodekaer Virtual reality is especially effective in science education. While virtual reality is nearly universally applicable, companies like Labster are demonstrating the extremely effective power of virtual simulations in science and education. Labster has developed a fully simulated 1:1 laboratory simulation for students to explore and learn. Using both realistic settings and mathematical equations, Labster has developed a virtual simulation laboratory that mirrors much of our own reality’s laws of probability and outcomes. Labster can be used to teach students about lab safety. Through Labster’s lab safety simulation, a three-dimensional character guides students as it takes them through the virtual lab and teaches them about safety. With the addition of virtual reality gloves, students can physically use their own hands to carry out lab procedures and react to emergency situations. Labster takes virtual simulation one step beyond reality. Though Labster can mirror reality when needed, its software also possesses the ability for users to “shrink” to the molecular level and explore simulations on the micro level. This can be applied to research related to cancer, viruses, and diseases enabled by the user’s ability to explore the body in an extremely detailed manner. Labster is 76% more effective than traditional teaching methods in science. Perhaps even more promising, when Labster is combined with traditional teaching it is 101% more effective than teaching alone. This is due to Labster’s close monitoring of students through the use of EEG brain technology and facial recognition software to track how a student is reacting to a simulation. And with the addition of quizzes within the simulation, professors can track the progress of their students. Most encouraging of all, Labster has the ability to assist low-knowledge students in catching up with their peers. There needs to be meaning and identification in these simulations for students to retain learning and stay engaged. For example, in one of Labster’s simulations, students are placed in a crime scene where they must gather evidence and analyze it in a lab to solve the mystery of the murder. It is through settings such as this that students are truly able to take an interest in the content of the simulation, and retain knowledge for much longer. Labster allows users to create their own simulations. Because of Labster’s easy customization, users can create their own simulations to test out hypotheses and communicate their research. To read or download the rest of the essays from this special report on the Future of Work and Education, download our free app on your favorite device (iStoreGoogle Play, and Amazon Kindle) or click to view the Digital Edition.    

About
Winona Roylance
:
Winona Roylance is Diplomatic Courier's Managing Editor and Special Series Editor.
The views presented in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent the views of any other organization.

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www.diplomaticourier.com

Education and Virtual Reality

Vistual Glasses and Abstract Background
April 27, 2017

Presenter: Michael Bodekaer, Founder of Labster With the rise of virtual reality, virtual simulations are becoming increasingly prominent in nearly all sectors. In science education specifically, virtual laboratories are being used to educate high school and college students in a variety of different procedures, including laboratory safety guidelines, microscopic cell and cancer research, and real world simulations. In conjunction with hardware designed to help users interact with their virtual environments – such as virtual reality goggles and glove sensors - virtual simulations are quickly approaching a reality nearly as detailed as our own. And with virtual technology’s ease of distribution and cost-effective methods, VR-centered education may provide potential solutions to many of the problems faced by today’s educational institutions. Virtual simulation technology provides many solutions for problems in education. With the help of virtual reality technology, issues related to gaining relevant work experience in a school setting and keeping students active and engaged can be addressed with VR tech. Virtual simulation is already the preferred teaching method in many disciplines. In flight schools around the world, flight simulators are being used in conjunction with traditional teaching methods in an effort to educate students as they gain relevant flight experience without the dangers of actually flying. In fact, over 90% of experimental comparisons favored flight simulation and training instead of just training alone. Virtual simulations can be used in almost any field. In addition to its applicability in flight schools, virtual simulations can also be used in almost any sector, including architecture, politics, and science education. Only 41% of STEM students finish their degree. With less than half of STEM students finishing their degree, there is a need for new technology to be developed in order to keep students interested and engaged. Through virtual simulation technology, however, students not only stay constantly engaged with their education, but also develop a skillset that will be relevant to the workforce upon graduation. Virtual reality is easily distributable and cost-effective. Unlike traditional laboratory settings that cost time, money, and space, virtual laboratories are available to anyone with a smart device such as a smartphone, tablet, or even a simple Internet browser. Therefore, virtual simulation technology has the ability to alleviate issues with costs, time, and space that so many educational institutions experience. “These simulations empower students in their belief to go out there with their skills and solve really important global challenges.” – Michael Bodekaer Virtual reality is especially effective in science education. While virtual reality is nearly universally applicable, companies like Labster are demonstrating the extremely effective power of virtual simulations in science and education. Labster has developed a fully simulated 1:1 laboratory simulation for students to explore and learn. Using both realistic settings and mathematical equations, Labster has developed a virtual simulation laboratory that mirrors much of our own reality’s laws of probability and outcomes. Labster can be used to teach students about lab safety. Through Labster’s lab safety simulation, a three-dimensional character guides students as it takes them through the virtual lab and teaches them about safety. With the addition of virtual reality gloves, students can physically use their own hands to carry out lab procedures and react to emergency situations. Labster takes virtual simulation one step beyond reality. Though Labster can mirror reality when needed, its software also possesses the ability for users to “shrink” to the molecular level and explore simulations on the micro level. This can be applied to research related to cancer, viruses, and diseases enabled by the user’s ability to explore the body in an extremely detailed manner. Labster is 76% more effective than traditional teaching methods in science. Perhaps even more promising, when Labster is combined with traditional teaching it is 101% more effective than teaching alone. This is due to Labster’s close monitoring of students through the use of EEG brain technology and facial recognition software to track how a student is reacting to a simulation. And with the addition of quizzes within the simulation, professors can track the progress of their students. Most encouraging of all, Labster has the ability to assist low-knowledge students in catching up with their peers. There needs to be meaning and identification in these simulations for students to retain learning and stay engaged. For example, in one of Labster’s simulations, students are placed in a crime scene where they must gather evidence and analyze it in a lab to solve the mystery of the murder. It is through settings such as this that students are truly able to take an interest in the content of the simulation, and retain knowledge for much longer. Labster allows users to create their own simulations. Because of Labster’s easy customization, users can create their own simulations to test out hypotheses and communicate their research. To read or download the rest of the essays from this special report on the Future of Work and Education, download our free app on your favorite device (iStoreGoogle Play, and Amazon Kindle) or click to view the Digital Edition.    

About
Winona Roylance
:
Winona Roylance is Diplomatic Courier's Managing Editor and Special Series Editor.
The views presented in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent the views of any other organization.