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In celebration of the International Day of Happiness on March 20th, Gallup recently released its 2016 Global Emotions Report detailing the emotional status of countries around the world. Based on nearly 147,000 interviews with adults in 140 different countries in 2015, the report measures happiness in terms of how often people experience happiness – through laughter, smiling, and enjoyment – rather than the standard format of asking people how they perceive their own happiness. The report found that in terms of positive emotions, 71% of people worldwide reported having positive experiences on the day before the survey. This criteria was based on whether or not the participant: felt well-rested, was treated with respect, had smiled or laughed a lot, learned or did something interesting, and/or experienced enjoyment at any point during the day before the survey. Astonishingly, 7 out of the top 10 countries with the highest Positive Experience Index were from Latin America, with Paraguay coming in at number one with 84%. On the other end of the spectrum, Syria ranked last for the fourth year in a row with 36%. Despite this wide gap, majorities in nearly all countries surveyed say they smiled or laughed a lot the day before the interview. Unfortunately, the Negative Experience Index also saw an increase in the past year. More than 1/3 of people reported experiencing a lot of worry or stress, with 28% experiencing physical pain, 21% reporting sadness, and 20% experiencing anger the day before the survey. Iraq ranked number one on this year’s Negative Experience Index at 58%, with Iran coming in second place at 50%. Both countries have been at the top of the list for the last five years. Despite an increasing Negative Experience Index, the global happiness average of 71% has remained surprisingly consistent since 2006. Similarly, 72% of people reported smiling or laughing a lot the day before the interview, with only seven countries – Iraq, Nepal, Serbia, Syria, Turkey, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine – reporting less than 50% on the laughter and smiling scale. People around the world tend to be happy, and Gallup’s report reveals this by providing a unique index that measures the experience of happiness, rather than the perception of happiness. It’s good to know that on this year’s International Day of Happiness, we truly do have something to celebrate. Read the full report here.

About
Winona Roylance
:
Winona Roylance is Diplomatic Courier's Managing Editor and Special Series Editor.
The views presented in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent the views of any other organization.

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Who Are the Happiest People in the World?

Two people in silhouette jumping happily on a beach
March 20, 2016

In celebration of the International Day of Happiness on March 20th, Gallup recently released its 2016 Global Emotions Report detailing the emotional status of countries around the world. Based on nearly 147,000 interviews with adults in 140 different countries in 2015, the report measures happiness in terms of how often people experience happiness – through laughter, smiling, and enjoyment – rather than the standard format of asking people how they perceive their own happiness. The report found that in terms of positive emotions, 71% of people worldwide reported having positive experiences on the day before the survey. This criteria was based on whether or not the participant: felt well-rested, was treated with respect, had smiled or laughed a lot, learned or did something interesting, and/or experienced enjoyment at any point during the day before the survey. Astonishingly, 7 out of the top 10 countries with the highest Positive Experience Index were from Latin America, with Paraguay coming in at number one with 84%. On the other end of the spectrum, Syria ranked last for the fourth year in a row with 36%. Despite this wide gap, majorities in nearly all countries surveyed say they smiled or laughed a lot the day before the interview. Unfortunately, the Negative Experience Index also saw an increase in the past year. More than 1/3 of people reported experiencing a lot of worry or stress, with 28% experiencing physical pain, 21% reporting sadness, and 20% experiencing anger the day before the survey. Iraq ranked number one on this year’s Negative Experience Index at 58%, with Iran coming in second place at 50%. Both countries have been at the top of the list for the last five years. Despite an increasing Negative Experience Index, the global happiness average of 71% has remained surprisingly consistent since 2006. Similarly, 72% of people reported smiling or laughing a lot the day before the interview, with only seven countries – Iraq, Nepal, Serbia, Syria, Turkey, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine – reporting less than 50% on the laughter and smiling scale. People around the world tend to be happy, and Gallup’s report reveals this by providing a unique index that measures the experience of happiness, rather than the perception of happiness. It’s good to know that on this year’s International Day of Happiness, we truly do have something to celebrate. Read the full report here.

About
Winona Roylance
:
Winona Roylance is Diplomatic Courier's Managing Editor and Special Series Editor.
The views presented in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent the views of any other organization.